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authority records
Religions

Cumberland United Church

  • Corporate body
  • 1926-2017

Cumberland United Church, established in 1926, had its origins in two earlier congregations, both founded in 1888, at the Union Mines coal mining operation, which later grew into the village of Cumberland. Union Presbyterian Church, which was later renamed St. George's, became St. George's United Church in 1925. Grace Methodist Church, which was part of the larger Cumberland Circuit which included points at Denman Island, Union Bay and Grantham, became Grace United. A Japanese Mission church also existed in Cumberland, although the only record of activities in this fonds are baptismal records of Cumberland Circuit. St. George's and Grace merged in 1926 to form Cumberland United Church and one pastoral charge. From 1950 until 1980, Union Bay and Denman Island congregations were again part of the Cumberland Pastoral Charge. Cumberland United Church disbanded on December 31, 2017.

First Presbyterian Church (Victoria, B.C.)

  • Corporate body
  • 1863-1925

In 1861, the Presbyterian Church of Ireland sent a missionary to British Columbia. After months of travel throughout the colony, he organized "First Presbyterian Church of Vancouver Island" in Victoria in February, 1862. Initial services were held in various halls, until the church was opened in October, 1863 at Pandora and Blanshard. Difficulties arose in 1866, leading to the founding of St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, and the closure of First Presbyterian Church from 1867 to 1876. In 1882, the First Presbyterian congregation joined the Presbyterian Church in Canada. It was burned in a fire in 1883, but rebuilt the same year, and expanded in 1890. In 1913, a new church school hall at Quadra and Fisgard was completed; the congregation vacated the church and met at the school hall. The cornerstone for a new church building at that site was laid in September 1914, and the building was completed and dedicate in May 1915. The First Presbyterian Church congregation entered the United Church of Canada in 1925, becoming First United Church.

First United Church (Victoria, B.C.)

  • Corporate body
  • 1863-1997

In 1861, the Presbyterian Church of Ireland sent a missionary to British Columbia. After months of travel throughout the colony, he organized "First Presbyterian Church of Vancouver Island" in Victoria in February, 1862. Initial services were held in various halls, until the church was opened in October, 1863 at Pandora and Blanshard. Difficulties arose in 1866, leading to the founding of St. Andrew's Presbyterian Church, and the closure of First Presbyterian Church from 1867 to 1876. In 1882, the First Presbyterian congregation joined the Presbyterian Church in Canada. It was burned in a fire in 1883, but rebuilt the same year, and expanded in 1890. In 1913, a new church school hall at Quadra and Fisgard was completed; the congregation vacated the church and met at the school hall. The cornerstone for a new church building at that site was laid in September 1914, and the building was completed and dedicate in May 1915. The First Presbyterian Church congregation entered the United Church of Canada in 1925, becoming First United Church. The First Presbyterian Church congregation entered the United Church of Canada in 1925, becoming First United Church. In 1997, First United Church and Metropolitan United Church were amalgamated in the First United Church building and the congregation became known a First-Metropolitan United Church.

Imai, Joan

  • Person
  • [192-?]-2018

Joan Imai was a member of the Vancouver Japanese United Church English-Speaking Congregation, from 1971 until 1979. Her husband, Gordon, was the minister of the Lower Mainland Pastoral Charge of the Japanese United Church during that period. She and her husband returned to the Vancouver Japanese United Church after Gordon retired, and she remained a member until the English-Speaking Congregation closed in 2017.

Methodist Church of Canada. Woman's Missionary Society. British Columbia Conference Branch

  • Corporate body
  • 1891-1925

The first branch in B.C. of the Methodist Woman's Missionary Society was organized at the old Pandora Avenue Church in Victoria in 1888. It soon became the auxiliary of Metropolitan Church, and its original purpose was to help in the setting up of a "rescue home" for Chinese women and girls who had been forced into prostitution. Other local auxiliaries soon appeared throughout the province, and in 1891 they were unified through the establishment of the B.C. Conference Branch of the W.M.S. In 1904, District branches were created for Victoria, Vancouver, Westminster and Kamloops. Besides the rescue home in Victoria, the Methodist W.M.S. in B.C. supported Residential Schools such as the Crosby Girls' Home in Port Simpson (Lax Kw'alaams), the Coqualeetza Institute in Chilliwack, the Elizabeth Long Memorial Home in Kitamaat (Haisla); the Turner Institute in Vancouver; and Methodist hospitals at Port Simpson, Bella Bella and Hazelton.

Patricia and Glen Baker family

  • Family
  • [195-]

Patricia and Glen Baker were married in the mid-1950s. Both served as clergy within The United Church of Canada. Glen was ordained by BC Conference in 1958, and served several congregations throughout British Columbia, including the Nisei congregation of Vancouver Japanese United Church (1957) while he was a student at Union College; Prince George Rural; McBride; Richmond-Sea Island; First United (Vancouver); and Dunbar Heights (Vancouver). Patricia was a public health nurse (1955-1962). She later studied at Vancouver School of Theology and was ordained by BC Conference in 1984. The couple served in team ministry at First United, Kelowna (1984-1993) and West Howe Sound Pastoral Charge, Sechelt (1993-1998).

Presbyterian Church in Canada. Woman's Missionary Society. British Columbia Synod Branch

  • Corporate body
  • 1903-1925

The Presbyterian Woman's Missionary Society, nationally organized with a few auxiliaries in B.C., was originally concerned with foreign missions. Both native Indian and Chinese work in B.C. (as they were known at the time) were included as foreign. As an outgrowth of the committee, which supported the Atlin Hospital, a new organization emerged in 1903: the Woman's Home Missionary Society. In 1914, the two societies were united nationally as the Woman's Missionary Society and a provincial synod branch was organized. In addition to its support for the Atlin Hospital and a hospital at Telegraph Creek, it took special interest in the Loggers' Mission. Support was also give to Indian Residential and Day Schools at Alberni, Ahousaht, and Ucluelet. After church union in 1925, the society was merged into the Woman's Missionary Society of the United Church of Canada.

Uchida, Chizu

  • Person
  • [192-?]-2017

Chizu Uchida was born in Vancouver and attended the Powell Street Church (Japanese Mission) with her family until the internment of Japanese Canadians in 1942. She and her family attended the Japanese United Church in Montreal for a short while until returning to Vancouver in the mid-1950s. From that point, Chizu was a member of the Vancouver Japanese United Church, and a founding member of the English-Speaking Congregation in 1969. She served on the Church Board and also for a time as secretary of the national Japanese United Church Conference (Kyogikai). She died in 2017.

Yamamoto, Dorothy

  • Person
  • 193-?-

Dorothy Yamamoto was a longtime member of the Vancouver Japanese United Church English Speaking congregation, until it closed in 2017.