Showing 125 results

authority records
Salmon Arm Museum

Arthur Alexander Dennys

  • MS 82 (Salmon Arm Museum)
  • Family
  • 1894-1942

Arthur Alexander Dennys was born in India in 1894. He immigrated to Canada from England in 1912, travelling across the Atlantic in the wake of the Titanic. After arriving in Salmon Arm he went into partnership with Bryan Heaney, purchasing farmland from F.A. McLeod.

Dennys wrote diaries of his life as a farmer. He married Joyce Mary Wright of Canoe in 1914 and the couple had two sons, Ronald and Kenneth.

In 1926 Dennys gave up farming and moved his family to Vernon, BC. There he assisted Dr. E.R. Buckell, at the Dominion Department of Agriculture, doing experiments and studying fruit insects until his unexpected death September 9, 1942. Dennys’ death was thought to be complicated by arsenic poisoning attributed to exposure to arsenic during experiments at work.

Joyce Mary Dennys passed away January 8, 1995 at the age of 97. She was a long time member of All Saints Anglican Church and the North Okanagan Naturalist Club. Joyce trained as a school teacher and taught for several years. In Vernon she was employed as an accountant with William Arnott Jewellers.

Arthur Alexander Dennys

  • MS 82 (Salmon Arm Museum)
  • Family
  • 1894-1942

Arthur Alexander Dennys was born in India in 1894. He immigrated to Canada from England in 1912, travelling across the Atlantic in the wake of the Titanic. After arriving in Salmon Arm he went into partnership with Bryan Heaney, purchasing farmland from F.A. McLeod.

Dennys wrote diaries of his life as a farmer. He married Joyce Mary Wright of Canoe in 1914 and the couple had two sons, Ronald and Kenneth.

In 1926 Dennys gave up farming and moved his family to Vernon, BC. There he assisted Dr. E.R. Buckell, at the Dominion Department of Agriculture, doing experiments and studying fruit insects until his unexpected death September 9, 1942. Dennys’ death was thought to be complicated by arsenic poisoning attributed to exposure to arsenic during experiments at work.

Joyce Mary Dennys passed away January 8, 1995 at the age of 97. She was a long time member of All Saints Anglican Church and the North Okanagan Naturalist Club. Joyce trained as a school teacher and taught for several years. In Vernon she was employed as an accountant with William Arnott Jewellers.

B.C. Fruit Growers Associaiton, Salmon Arm fonds

  • MS 10
  • Corporate body
  • 1888-current

The B.C. Fruit Growers' Association operated a local chapter in Salmon Arm. The following history is courtesy of the Greater Vernon Museum and Archives:

In November 1888, Alex McD. Allan of the Fruit Growers' Association of Ontario urged the Vancouver Board of Trade and City Council to 'one and all, work, speak, and think for the interests of horticulture'. As a result, a meeting was called in February 1889 to discuss bringing the horticulturists of the province together to exchange ideas and knowledge, and to raise standards in growing and marketing.

The newly formed association's constitution was drawn up with the objective 'to encourage the cultivation of fruits, vegetables, and flowers, and pursuits pertaining to horticulture, the promotion of bee culture, holding of exhibitions and collecting information regarding the different varieties of fruit best adapted for cultivation in this Province'.
The first year of operation saw the association tackling the problems of marketing, packaging and education. The first exhibition was held in May 1889. The 1890's saw the expansion of markets into Japan and the Prairies, with increased emphasis on pest control and improvements in packing. In the early days of the fruit industry in B.C., the chief centres for growing were Vancouver Island, the Fraser Valley, and Lytton. By 1904, due to irrigation projects in the Okanagan Valley, this area became a leading fruit growing centrepoint. By 1910, increased competition from Farmers' Institutes resulted in declining membership in the BCFGA. During the 1920's, problems also arose as a result of non - cooperation between the numerous independent shippers in B.C.

Aaron Shapiro, organizer of the citrus growers of California, spoke to the members of the BCFGA stressing the importance of organizing for the purpose of distribution. His message was heard and by 1923, 80 % of the growers in B.C. had signed up. As the largest shipping company in the province, the BCFGA carried the greatest share of the burden of distributing the crops. Expenses rose as cold storage facilities had to be provided. Increasing competition from independent producers resulted in the formation of marketing boards in the late 1920s.

By 1931 the Produce Marketing Act was struck down by the Supreme Court, and internal competition between shippers began again. By 1933, the BCFGA was bankrupt due to the withdrawal of provincial funding and the lack of support from growers. A small group of Vernon growers put the association together again, but low prices forced the organization's members to refuse to deliver fruit to shippers unless guaranteed a reasonable price. A grower's strike resulted. The BCFGA again led the way in obtaining both federal and provincial marketing acts to stabilize prices. By 1939, the BCFGA was still battling the issue of how to set up a successful central selling agency. By 1940, the federal government took complete control of marketing, a situation that lasted until 1947. Trade restrictions banning importation of fruit from the U.S. created excellent domestic markets for B.C. growers.

The severe winter 1949/1950 devastated many orchards in the Shuswap, and the BCFGA was forced to distribute a quarter of a million dollars of government funding for tree replacement. By 1955, the fruit industry was in trouble again. Despite a booming economy, the growers were going broke. They felt that the BCFGA was top-heavy and lacking in initiative. As a result of a BCFGA convention resolution, a royal commission was set up to investigate the industry. In their published McPhee Report of 1958, the commission gave a general approval to the system as it stood. With the improvement in B.C.'s highways in the 1950s and 1960s, it became easier for fruit to be shipped to market. Local sales jumped as tourism increased. Unfortunately, many orchards were being replaced by housing. The BCFGA began a campaign to emphasize the economic importance of farmers to their communities. A combination of high operating costs, low returns and lack of government assistance led to demands for reform of BCFGA policies. In 1973, the Land Commission Act was passed, and the BCFGA worked with the provincial government to rectify the inadequacies of agriculture. Between 1974 and 1989, the BCFGA and the tree fruit industry worked on distribution of their product and how to defuse rivalries between the various agricultural organizations and packing houses. Marketing boards fell into disfavour as consumers accused them of being responsible for the rising cost of food. In 1974, 20 out of 2800 growers left the BCFGA to become independent. During the 1970s and 1980s, the BCFGA struggled with changes in government policies, low crop returns, further erosion of farmland, and competition from cheap imports of fruit. In 1989, the BCFGA celebrated their 100th year of existence.

B.C. Fruit Growers Association, Salmon Arm fonds

  • MS 10
  • Corporate body
  • 1889-current

The B.C. Fruit Growers' Association operated a local chapter in Salmon Arm.

The following history of the organization is courtesy of the Greater Vernon Museum and Archives:
In November 1888, Alex McD. Allan of the Fruit Growers' Association of Ontario urged the Vancouver Board of Trade and City Council to 'one and all, work, speak, and think for the interests of horticulture'. As a result, a meeting was called in February 1889 to discuss bringing the horticulturists of the province together to exchange ideas and knowledge, and to raise standards in growing and marketing.

The newly formed association's constitution was drawn up with the objective 'to encourage the cultivation of fruits, vegetables, and flowers, and pursuits pertaining to horticulture, the promotion of bee culture, holding of exhibitions and collecting information regarding the different varieties of fruit best adapted for cultivation in this Province'.

The first year of operation saw the association tackling the problems of marketing, packaging and education. The first exhibition was held in May 1889. The 1890's saw the expansion of markets into Japan and the Prairies, with increased emphasis on pest control and improvements in packing. In the early days of the fruit industry in B.C., the chief centres for growing were Vancouver Island, the Fraser Valley, and Lytton. By 1904, due to irrigation projects in the Okanagan Valley, this area became a leading fruit growing centre point. By 1910, increased competition from Farmers' Institutes resulted in declining membership in the BCFGA. During the 1920's, problems also arose as a result of non - cooperation between the numerous independent shippers in B.C.

Aaron Shapiro, organizer of the citrus growers of California, spoke to the members of the BCFGA stressing the importance of organizing for the purpose of distribution. His message was heard and by 1923, 80 % of the growers in B.C. had signed up. As the largest shipping company in the province, the BCFGA carried the greatest share of the burden of distributing the crops. Expenses rose as cold storage facilities had to be provided. Increasing competition from independent producers resulted in the formation of marketing boards in the late 1920s.

By 1931 the Produce Marketing Act was struck down by the Supreme Court, and internal competition between shippers began again. By 1933, the BCFGA was bankrupt due to the withdrawal of provincial funding and the lack of support from growers. A small group of Vernon growers put the association together again, but low prices forced the organization's members to refuse to deliver fruit to shippers unless guaranteed a reasonable price. A grower's strike resulted. The BCFGA again led the way in obtaining both federal and provincial marketing acts to stabilize prices. By 1939, the BCFGA was still battling the issue of how to set up a successful central selling agency. By 1940, the federal government took complete control of marketing, a situation that lasted until 1947. Trade restrictions banning importation of fruit from the U.S. created excellent domestic markets for B.C. growers.

The severe winter 1949/1950 devastated many orchards in the Shuswap, and the BCFGA was forced to distribute a quarter of a million dollars of government funding for tree replacement. By 1955, the fruit industry was in trouble again. Despite a booming economy, the growers were going broke. They felt that the BCFGA was top-heavy and lacking in initiative. As a result of a BCFGA convention resolution, a royal commission was set up to investigate the industry. In their published McPhee Report of 1958, the commission gave a general approval to the system as it stood. With the improvement in B.C.'s highways in the 1950s and 1960s, it became easier for fruit to be shipped to market. Local sales jumped as tourism increased. Unfortunately, many orchards were being replaced by housing. The BCFGA began a campaign to emphasize the economic importance of farmers to their communities. A combination of high operating costs, low returns and lack of government assistance led to demands for reform of BCFGA policies. In 1973, the Land Commission Act was passed, and the BCFGA worked with the provincial government to rectify the inadequacies of agriculture. Between 1974 and 1989, the BCFGA and the tree fruit industry worked on distribution of their product and how to defuse rivalries between the various agricultural organizations and packing houses. Marketing boards fell into disfavour as consumers accused them of being responsible for the rising cost of food. In 1974, 20 out of 2800 growers left the BCFGA to become independent. During the 1970s and 1980s, the BCFGA struggled with changes in government policies, low crop returns, further erosion of farmland, and competition from cheap imports of fruit. In 1989, the BCFGA celebrated their 100th year of existence.

Belli-Bivar (family)

  • MS 05 (Salmon Arm Museum)
  • Family
  • 1877-1966

Captain Roderick Belli-Bivar, M.B.E. (1890-1939) was a professional soldier and saw service in the Indian Army. In 1912, his grandfather sent him to British Columbia to purchase land. The first acreage he purchased was in "Little England" near where South Canoe is today.

Roderick met his wife, Ethel Stirling, at a ball in Salmon Arm. However, at the outset of WW I, he enlisted and returned to England. Ethel joined him in England in 1915 and they were married there.

The couple returned to Canada in 1919 and in 1920 purchased 40 acres of land from Captain Leonard, complete with a frame house, on Rotton Row. Two children were born to the couple - Valerie Patricia Elvira (b. 1924, m. 1945 to Lloyd Galbraith), and Roderic (note spelling) Gordon (b. 1920). The family relocated to Riverside, California for two years in 1931 and 1934 while Captain Belli-Bivar convalesced and the children continued their education by correspondence. The family returned to Salmon Arm and in 1935 they built a larger home on their orchard property.

Captain Belli-Bivar was much involved in fruit growing and marketing, was a Fruit Inspector and a member of the BC Tree Fruits Limited. He was also prominent in the tennis and badminton sports. Ethel (1892-1987) was a successful fruit farmer, a "lady" prospector and very active in the Salmon Arm community organizations.

Big Shuswap Tourism Committee

  • MS 3 (Salmon Arm Museum)
  • Corporate body
  • 1985-

The Big Shuswap Tourism Committee was created to promote tourism in the Shuswap. The committee is currently called Tourism Shuswap. It operates a website that promotes events and tourism in the Shuswap.

Boat Owners Association (Salmon Arm, B.C.)

  • MS 06 (Salmon Arm Museum)
  • Corporate body
  • 1925-1952

The history of the Boat Owners Association is sketchy. The club was formed to promote access to Shuswap Lake and used the wharf at Salmon Arm to moor its members' recreational boats. The lake provided access to isolated parts of the region, where roadways remained undeveloped.

The members built a shed that existed until 1921 and created walkways at two levels, allowing for dry routes regardless of water levels.

The club became inactive for fifteen years until 1939 when a group reactivated the club under its original charter. Cyril Thomson was elected chairman and Rex Lingford as secretary. Other members included S.A. Miller, A.D. Meek, P.A. Gorse, C.R. Barlow, R. Buckle, F.H. Burne, Mark Bellamy, Vern Green, C.M. Kennedy, R. Jaimeson, H. Jacobi, C.J. Miller, A.D. Meek, P. McGregor, G. S. Robertson, Wm. McDiarmid, R.J. McGregor, P.A. Ruth, G.S. Robertson, E.C. Turner, Gus Tweeddale and J.E. Wood.

Bordessa (family)

  • MS 07 (Salmon Arm Museum)
  • Family
  • 1913-1936

Bernard Cuthbert Bordessa was born in Cheshire, England in 1887. He trained as a civil Engineer and immigrated to Canada, working on the engineering crew of the Great Trunk Railway in 1913. Early photographs reflect his time on the crew near Hazelton, BC.

In 1915 Bordessa signed up for duty at Vernon, BC and served in the Canadian Expeditionary Force. When he returned to Canada, he purchased land in Canoe, BC through the Soldier Settlement Board. The acreage was purchased from Will Kirk in 1921 and Bordessa appears as a fruit farmer from 1921 to 1924, and 1934-1936. He planted apple trees and put an addition on the original house.

From 1921 to 1937 Bordessa also served as a civil engineer in several locations in BC until he was permanently employed by Western Air Command and the B.C.E. (now known as BC Hydro).

In 1927 Bordessa married Edith Dorothy Denison [1893-1981], and the couple had two children, Bobby and Eileen. Bobby was born in 1930, missing a thymus gland and never grew properly. He was hospitalized in New Westminster at the age of five at a childrens hospital and lived until the age of 11. Unfortunately, BC Archives and Records Service has no death record for Bobby (or Robert) Bordessa. Some time prior to 1939 the Bordessa family sold their property and moved away to Vancouver.

Eileen was born in 1931 and speaks frankly about her brother's death. It was a painful event for her parents. She was never allowed to refer to him or ask questions about him for many years. At the age of nineteen she moved to Toronto to continue violin studies at the Faculty of Music, University of Toronto. She currently resides in Ontario.

The farm was eventually sold to the Abernathy family, who in turn sold the property to the Ackerman family. The house sits on property developed into a private golf course (Shuswap Golf Club, formerly Shannons) on Highway 1, east of Salmon Arm.

Branchflower (family)

  • MS 08 (Salmon Arm Museum)
  • Family
  • 1902-1961

Max Preston Branchflower (1893-1969) was born in Chilliwack, B.C. and moved to Silver Creek, near Salmon Arm, in 1907. Branchflower farmed at Silver Creek and has a road named for him there. His mother, Mary Eliza Branchflower (1869-1961) (nee Mathewson) was born in Barrie, Ontario. As a widow, Mrs. Branchflower moved to Silver Creek and resided with her son until her death.

According to local sources, Max Branchflower never married. His interests included dancing, farming, and automobiles.

Broadview Social Club

  • MS 11 (Salmon Arm Museum)
  • Corporate body
  • 1948-1970

The Broadview Social Club, also known as the Broadview Community Club, was formed to raise money for the construction of a Community Hall in 1948.

Brooke (family)

  • MS 12 (Salmon Arm Museum)
  • Family
  • 1913-1943

Arthur Adair Brooke (1874-1959) was born in Rome, Italy. He was raised and educated in both Switzerland and England. At 16 years of age, he moved to Canada and took up residence in Carmen, Manitoba, where he began to farm in 1894. He later moved to Didsbury, Alberta, where he homesteaded.

Mr. A.A. Brooke moved to Salmon Arm in 1907 and acquired property in the Salmon River Valley region. He farmed this area until his retirement in 1944.

An active member of the community, Mr. Brooke lead the development of the Salmon Arm Creamery and he was president of the Dairymen's Co-operative Organization for 12 years. Arthur Brooke served as a member of the municipal council when the Ward System was still in effect. As well, he had a healthy involvement in church matters and was a member of the Baptist congregation.

Mr. Brooke had a strong interest in cows; in particular, in Holstein cattle. He was a long-standing member of the Holstein-Friesian Association of Canada. Mr. Brooke was also an accomplished artist; his work in water colours depicting farm and homesteading scenes became well known across Eastern Canada and United States.

Mr. Brooke was married to Annie Florence Brooke (Ruth). Together, they had three sons: Harold Arthur, Ralph Edward, and Ernest Cuthbert, and one daughter: Ruth Adair. At the time of his death, he was survived by all of his children, 12 grandchildren and 16 great-grandchildren, five brothers: Charles, Hugh, Stephen, Robin, and Percy, and one sister.

Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce

  • MS 17 (Salmon Arm Museum)
  • Corporate body
  • 1940-1967

The Canadian Bank of Commerce opened on January 7, 1911. The bank was built on Alexander Street, next to the present day Salmar Classic Theatre and home of Street Scene, a clothing store.

The first manager was A.J. Marlowe who hired the first female, Nina Stirling (Freeman). Subsequent managers were: KS Campbell, GN Harmon (acting), LE Brawders, F Pearson (following amalgamation with the Bank of Hamilton), G Kyle, WR Davies, FN Gisborne, SC Elliot, NH Affleck, DW Bruce, VH Lyons, JGR Scales, GE Bardo, and HL Paterson.

The merger with the Bank of Hamilton took place in 1923 and the name became the Canadian Bank of Commerce. In 1961 the Canadian Bank of Commerce amalgamated with the Imperial Bank of Canada and the name became The Canadian Imperial Bank of Commerce.

Canadian Society for the Control of Cancer Salmon Arm Branch

  • MS 14 (Salmon Arm Museum)
  • Corporate body
  • 1938-1981

In July, 1938 an organizational meeting was held for the Canadian Society for the Control of Cancer at the Salmon Arm Hospital in Salmon Arm. Those present included Dr. A. Beech, W.H. Grant, Cyril Thomson, J.L Jackson, Mrs. C.J.R. Stirling, Dr. H. Baker, K. Hunter, C.C. Barker, Mr. Damgaard, Miss Ida Harbell and H.F. Pardy. Dr. Beech acted as Chair. The group planned a campaign for membership, printed pamphlets, raised funds and increased awareness of cancer. The organization was also known as the Salmon Arm Unit of the Canadian Cancer Society and the Shuswap Unit of the Cancer Society.

Canoe United Church

  • MS 92 (Salmon Arm Museum)
  • Corporate body
  • 1925-

Canoe United Church was founded at the time of church union in 1925 and is part of Kamloops-Okanagan Presbytery. Prior to church union, Methodist services began in Canoe as early as 1888 as members of an interdenominational church gathered in people's homes. Rev. Calvert was the first minister to serve the community. He frequently traveled from Revelstoke by horse and walked when weather was poor.

When the Canoe School was built in 1908, the community congregation faithfully met there. When the community all was built in 1919, services relocated to "Victory Hall."

Rogert Kirk donated a lot to build the church in 1921. Members of the Methodist Church financed the structure. Contractor W.H. Ireland completed the building for $1,593. The first service was held October 30, 1921 and was conductd by Rev. J.D. Hobden. When the Methodist, Presbyterian, and Congregationalist Churches united in 1925, Canoe United Church was givent its new name and became part of Mount Ida Pastoral Charge (1925-1928), Malakwa Pastoral Charge (1929-1930), Malakwa-Arrowhead Pastoral Charge (1931-1936), and Salmon Arm Pastoral Charge (1937-2009). Canoe United Church is currently an independent pastoral charge.

Some Ministers associated with the church are C.L. Best (1922-1924), T. Keyworth (1924-1926), J.E. Griffiths (1926-1929), J.F. Shaw (1929-1934), E.S. Fleming (1934-1938), V.H. Sansum (1938-1942), F.R.G. Dredge (1942-1947), A.O. Clements (1947-1960), C. Swallow (1960-1966), D. McQuarrie (1966-1971), J. Johnson (1971-1975), D. Salter (1975-1976), and Alvin Adams 1976.

Carlin (family)

  • MS 15 (Salmon Arm Museum)
  • Family
  • 1896-1993

Robert Jennings Carlin was born in Kandiyohi, Minnesota, October 1896. James A. Carlin, Robert's father, moved the family, including infant Mildred to Kault in 1898. Three girls and a boy were born afterwards, Evelyn, Kathleen, Howard and Doreen.

James Carlin was mill superintendent at Tappen, working for the Columbia River Lumber Co. The company was owned by his brother Michael and business partner Fred Jones. James purchased Joe Genelle's home, former owner of the mill, for his family.

James Carlin purchased land in Grindrod and logged the property. The land was cleared of timber and sold prior to WW I to the North Coast Land Company of Vancouver for $50/acre for 1300 acres. The company paid a $10,000 down payment.

The land developers eventually got into financial difficulties and the Grindrod property returned to James Carlin through court action.

Robert worked for his father as an adolescent, haying the property in Grindrod. He went to Minnesota during the war. He found employment with the Great Northern Railway through relatives. He worked in Calgary for two years for Maclin Motors. He relocated to Powell River for eleven years. Robert returned to Tappen when his father became ill. He farmed the Tappen property from 1943 to 1964. He moved to Salmon Arm in 1967.

Centennial High School Reunion Commemorative Book (Salmon Arm, B.C.)

  • MS 91 (Salmon Arm Museum)
  • Corporate body
  • 2004-2006

The Centennial High School Reunion took place in 2005 in Salmon Arm, British Columbia. Names, photos and histories of those educated in Salmon Arm over the last century were obtained for the reunion, and a commemorative book was published.

Cooperative Granite Trading Association

  • MS 19 (Salmon Arm Museum)
  • Corporate body
  • 1915-

As the number of settlers in the Tappen Valley grew, so did demand for consumer commodities. In the early 1900s, settlers in the Tappen Valley organized the Tappen Farmers' Exchange to facilitate the sale of their produce and purchase supplies. In 1907, Henry Banks built a store on the CPR right-of-way, but his business was impacted by the growth of the Tappen Farmers' Exchange. When the Exchange offered to buy his store, he agreed to the sale and it was at this point that the Co-Operative Granite Trading Company came into being June 4th, 1915.

The Co-Operative Granite Trading Company's founding directors were Charles Mobley, Henry Calhoun, William Sanderson, Gus Annala and James A. Carlin. The assets of the CGTA fluctuated with the ups and downs of the economy of the country. On June 4th, 2000, the Co-Operative Granite Trading Association (Tappen Co-Op) celebrated 85 years of service to the community.

Doe (family)

  • Family
  • 1912-1986

Ernest Doe (1912-1986) was a long time resident of Salmon Arm. He was born in Bulwell, England. He worked as an accountant and auditor in Salmon Arm. He was author of "The Centennial History of Salmon Arm" and was named citizen of the year in 1963.

Ernest Doe was active in many of the community's organizations. He was secretary of the Chamber of Commerce for 25 years, secretary of the Salmon Arm Museum for 17 years, was involved with the Salmon Arm Community Association for 11 years, and was Salmon Arm's volunteer weatherman since 1950. Ernest took over the position of volunteer weatherman from his father, who had served from 1925-1950. Ernest was also an amateur radio operator.

Ernest married Margaret Catherine Avery, had two children, Alan and Helen (Hill Tout) and one grandson, David Mathew Hill Tout, at the time of his death.

Duncan, Frank

  • MS 21 (Salmon Arm Museum)
  • Person
  • 1878-1970

Francis (Frank) Duncan was born in Missouri in 1878. As a child, he and his parents lived in California and Texas. After the death of his parents, Duncan returned to Missouri to live with his grandparents. Duncan trained as a photographer, returned to Texas to work and then decided to "go up into Canada fishing."

Duncan arrived in Salmon Arm in 1913 and opened a photography studio above the Kualt store. He was a widower at the time and sent for his daughter, Kathleen. Neighbours, the Reilly family, took care of the young girl at Tappen, while Duncan tried to make a living. To supplement his studio work, Duncan sold subscriptions to the Observer and bartered exchanges for his catches of fish.

The Salmon Arm Observer notes that Duncan was an experienced photographer when he arrived in the area. He specialized in railroad and newspaper photography, and had worked throughout Canada, the United States and Mexico.

The Salmon Arm Observer commissioned Duncan to take photographs of all parts of the Shuswap. Interestingly, on June 18, 1914 the editors note that Mr. Duncan had a hydroplane that he used on Shuswap Lake. Duncan later worked in Klamath Falls, Oregon before moving to Texas. He made homes in Presidio, Terlingua and, finally, Marfa in 1916. According to The Big Bend Sentinel, Duncan considered himself primarily a prospector, with photographic skills. He approached ranchers in Texas, asking to prospect, but was usually denied access to their land. Then, as a back up, Duncan offered to take portraits of the ranchers' families and landscapes of their ranches. The Marfa Presidio County Museum houses 2,200 of Duncan's glass and film negatives from the region. Duncan loved hunting, fishing and the outdoors. He died July 9, 1970 at Brownfield, Texas and was buried at Mt. Olive Cemetery in Big Spring, Texas. Duncan was 91.

Eagle Bay Board of School Trustees

  • MS 22 (Salmon Arm Museum)
  • Corporate body
  • 1921-1944

The Eagle Bay School Board built a log cabin school in July, 1921. The building was 30 by 20 feet. According to the minutes a second building was constructed in 1929 that measured 20 by 26 feet at a value of $1050. Both schools were attended by Jim Day, board chairman, of Eagle Bay.

In 1923, the Board moved to build a house for the school teacher. Each winter the board supplied five cords of wood and saw to the maintenance of the school and grounds.

Earl Tomyn

  • MS 75
  • Person
  • 1932-2003

Earl Alvin Tomyn was born 10 April, 1932,on a farm in Margo, Saskatchewan to Mike and Anna Tomyn. One of ten children, Tomyn is of Ruthenian descent. His parents immigrated to Canada from Austria, through Ellis Island in 1910.

Tomyn began elementary school at the age of 8 in 1940, completing his public school studies in 1951. He worked in a variety of jobs including the Hudson Bay Mining and Smelting Company in Flin Flon, Manitoba (1952), the oil fields in Leduc, at Canadian Equipment Sales and Service Co. in Edmonton (1953) and in a pharmacy in Lucky Lake, Sask. (1954). Tomyn then worked as a reporter for AThe Post@ in Fairview Alberta (1954) and for Fairview Photo (1955). Wanting further training, Tomyn enrolled in the Falk School of Professional Photography in Maryville, Missouri, graduating in 1956. His jobs included working at Heath Photography in Melfort, Sask, then Fairview Photo Studio 1956-1957). In 1957 he worked at Edstrom Studio in Winona, Minnesota. Tired of the wages, Tomyn moved back to Flin Flon, Manitoba to work for Mid West Diamond Drilling as a relief driller and timekeeper. At Mid West he created a commissary for other employees.

From 1958 to 1960 Tomyn owned and operated Earl=s Photo Studio at Leader Saskatchewan. In 1960 he moved to Edmonton, working for Goertz Photo Studio, as a contracted photographer for the Edmonton Journal. In 1961 he moved to Camrose, to work at Langbell=s studio. During 1963 Tomyn moved frequently, working in the resource and construction sectors in Clearwater, BC, Pinepoint, NWT and Little Fort, BC.

In 1965 Tomyn moved to Avola and worked as a driller for Emil Anderson Construction. He and his family moved to Salmon Arm, where he worked for Federated Cooperative in Canoe. From 1969 to 1976 Tomyn operated Earl's Photo Studio in Salmon Arm. From 1976 to 1993 Tomyn returned to work at Federated Cooperative as a forklift driver and watchman.

While in Salmon Arm, Tomyn took an active interest in First United Church, The Salmon Arm Fall Fair Board, The Lions Club, Salmon Arm Light Horse Academy, and Salmon Arm Museum. In 1980,he wrote the The History of Margo Sask ,a 400 page volume encompassing the history of the area and it=s people from the early 1900's . He also compiled a phonetic language dictionary of English to Ruthenian.

On November 5, 1966 Tomyn married Marjorie Kernaghan [1937-1991]. The couple had two children, Michael Walter, born Aug. 8, 1967 and Anne Marie, born March 10, 1969.

Earl Tomyn died at his home in Blind Bay, BC with his family around him on 13 October, 2003.

Ellenor, Leslie, 1935-

  • MS 85 (Salmon Arm Museum)
  • Person
  • 1935-

Les Ellenor was born in Dawlish, Devon, England in 1935 to his parents, Methodist Minister Thomas Ellenor and his wife Agnes. Les Ellenor received his education at Ripon Grammar School, which he proudly says was founded in 670 AD. He went to Durham University (1954-57) and then served in Germany as a Lieutenant in the British Army (1957-59). Discharged, Ellenor returned to university in 1960 to do a Diploma in Education at Oxford. He taught in England, New Zealand (Wellington College, 1962-1965) and eventually in Port Alberni, British Columbia. In 1969 Ellenor did a Masters degree in English at UBC and began teaching at Okanagan College in 1970.

While teaching at Alberni District Senior Secondary, Les Ellenor met widow Patricia Joan Brown Sedwick. Joan and Les were married in 1970. They have three children, Susan, Geoffrey and Jessica.

Les Ellenor was an English instructor at the Salmon Arm Campus of Okanagan College from 1970 to 2001. Ellenor's interests include cross country skiing and singing in the United Church Senior Choir.

Felix and Kathleen Noel

  • MS 115 (Salmon Arm Museum)
  • Family
  • 1939-2002

Felix Herve Noel was the seventh (7th) child of twelve (12) born to Albert and Regina Noel on March 6, 1916 in a farmhouse at Beauvallon, Alberta. When Felix was approximately seven (7) years of age, the Noel family moved to St. Paul, Alberta.

Kathleen (Kay) Viola Bryce was the third (3rd) and last child born to Elizabeth Jane and William Charles Bryce on August 15, 1919 in a farmhouse at Davisburg, Alberta.

In 1939, Kathleen married Felix Noel at St. Patrick’s Catholic Church in Midnapore, Alberta. Felix was French Canadian and Catholic, while Kathleen was Protestant. Although Kathleen’s parents and maternal grandmother were at first opposed to the marriage, they reconciled and her parents hosted a reception following the wedding ceremony. The couple made their first home on the Bryce family farm. Louis Charles Albert Noel, their first child, was born in September, 1940.

Felix signed up for active duty with the Canadian Arm Forces (Calgary Tank Regiment) on March 6, 1941. He trained in Barrie, Ontario as a radio operator and went overseas in approximately May, 1941.

On August 19, 1942 Felix crossed the English Channel at Dieppe, France as a radio operator on Churchill Tank #6, “Bert.” Felix was among the captured and taken prisoner there by the German forces. He was held as Prisoner of War in Germany until WWII ended in June 1945.

While Felix was away, Kay and Louis continued to live with her parents and elder sister, Estella Elizabeth Bryce, on the Davisburg farm. Kathleen helped with the farm work and packed parachutes for the DeWinton Elementary Training Flying School No. 31 - the British Commonwealth Royal Air Force also located in the rural Davisburg, Alberta area, just over 2 miles north of the farm.

The couple had six children, three boys: Louis, Maurice, and Ron, and three girls: Darline, Lydia and Vivianne. After the War II, they farmed at Davisburg, northeast of Okotoks, Alberta. On July 1, 1964 the family relocated to the Salmon Arm area after purchasing the Silver Creek Store (with fuel pumps) from Mr. Frank and Mrs. Elsie Pow.

In November 1964 a fire started in the area under the living quarters of the store and caused severe smoke damage. The family moved to a rental property four miles north of the store. Felix constructed a large frame building just north of the store to house the contents of the store during repairs. When the store was repaired and reopened, the large frame building was later turned into a garage and shop and Felix hired Ed Wilby to do mechanical work. The garage and fuel pumps were operated in conjunction with the Silver Creek Store.

Felix and Kathleen Noel sold the Silver Creek store business in 1968, and leased the fuel pumps to the new owners, the Wilsons from England. Felix became a licensed realtor selling real estate in Salmon Arm in the 1970s. He was active in many realty organizations and local community affairs. He spent more than five years on the Board of the Salmon Arm Savings and Credit Union including two terms as President. Felix was the first elected Chairman of the Columbia Regional District and served in that capacity for three years as well as serving on the executive of the Royal Canadian Legion. Felix held a continuous membership in the Legion from 1949 until his death in 2002.

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